CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) RESOURCE CENTER Read More

Aging & Disability Assistance

    Results: 29

  • ADA Implementation Assistance (1)
    TP-4000.3250-050

    ADA Implementation Assistance

    TP-4000.3250-050

    Programs that provide assistance for organizations that are in the process of implementing the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and have questions regarding its requirements.
  • Adult Day Programs (4)
    PH-0320

    Adult Day Programs

    PH-0320

    Programs that provide care and supervision in a protective setting for dependent adults living in the community during some portion of a 24-hour day. Services may include social and recreational activities, training that is essential for sustaining activities of daily living, hot meals, as appropriate and, if an adult day health care center, health and related services.
  • Adult Protective Services (1)
    PH-6500.0500

    Adult Protective Services

    PH-6500.0500

    Social services programs that provide assistance for older adults, people with disabilities and other vulnerable individuals who are unable to act on their own behalf or manage their own affairs, or who are in immediate danger due to physical or emotional abuse, unsafe or hazardous living conditions, exploitation, neglect, self-neglect or abandonment. Included are APS programs that investigate cases of abuse, neglect or exploitation working closely with a wide variety of professionals including physicians, nurses, firefighters and law enforcement officers following receipt of a report from friends, neighbors or others concerned for their safety; and public and private guardianship/conservatorship programs that make provisions for people who have been judged to be incompetent by the court by assuming responsibility for the care and custody of the individuals and/or for the management of their estates.
  • Adult Residential Care Homes (9)
    BH-8400.6000-040

    Adult Residential Care Homes

    BH-8400.6000-040

    Residential homes or facilities that offer personal care and individual attention for older adults, people with disabilities and other populations whose limitations prevent them from living alone. Adult residential care homes (which are also known as board and care homes, residential board and care homes, personal care homes or residential care facilities for the elderly) generally provide a room (which may be shared), meals and supervision; and may specialize in populations with specific needs such as people with Alzheimer's disease or those with developmental disabilities. Services vary from facility to facility but may include dietary and housekeeping services, monitoring of prescription medication, social and recreational opportunities, incontinence care and assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living. Some homes provide secured surroundings for confused elderly adults who may wander while others are unable to accept individuals who are incontinent or who have severe problems with memory loss. There is considerable variation among these homes in terms of size, resident mix, daily charges and services. Most but not all adult residential care homes or facilities are licensed by the state in which they are located.
  • Area Agencies on Aging (1)
    TD-1100.6500-050

    Area Agencies on Aging

    TD-1100.6500-050

    Substate organizations authorized under the Older Americans Act of 1965 to develop a comprehensive, coordinated system of community-based services for older adults within their planning and service area. State Units on Aging designate, provide federal and state funding, and monitor operations of AAAs. Eight states and the District of Columbia do not have AAAs and, therefore, serve the roles of both state and area agency. AAA's responsibilities include planning; development of local funding resources; and contracting with local service provider organizations to provide authorized services which include information and referral/assistance, outreach, case/care management, escort, transportation, homemaker/chore, personal care, home repair and rehabilitation, home delivered meals, congregate meals, adult day care, elder abuse prevention, nursing home ombudsman, legal assistance, employment and training, health promotion and disease prevention and senior centers as well as services that support caregivers including respite care, counseling and education programs. AAAs may provide a number of other services in situations where local service provider options are limited.
  • Assisted Living Facilities (10)
    BH-8400.6000-060

    Assisted Living Facilities

    BH-8400.6000-060

    Residential facilities specially constructed or converted to combine housing and supportive services in a "homelike" environment with the goal of maximizing the individual functioning and autonomy of residents. Assisted living facilities generally have private apartment-style accommodations with walk in showers, wide doors for wheelchair access, emergency pull cord systems and other special amenities; and offer the individualized array of personal care services which will allow each resident to function as independently as possible. Services vary from facility to facility, but usually include three meals a day with special diets, as required; housekeeping and linen services; personal laundry; social and recreational activities; transportation to medical appointments, stores and community services; money management assistance; assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living; medication management and administration; therapy and pharmacy services; and wellness and exercise programs. Assisted living facilities may be licensed by the state or may not require a license depending on the area in which they are located.
  • Bereavement Counseling (1)
    RP-1400.8000-100

    Bereavement Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-100

    Programs that provide emotional support, problem-solving assistance, information and guidance for people who have recently lost a loved one. Included are counseling programs for widows and widowers, children who have lost a parent, parents who have lost a child and people who are in other similar situations.
  • Caregiver/Care Receiver Support Groups (2)
    PN-8100.1400

    Caregiver/Care Receiver Support Groups

    PN-8100.1400

    Mutual support groups whose members are family, friends, significant others, non-familial caregivers or attendants who are caring for someone who has a temporary, chronic, life-threatening or terminal illness or disability or who is elderly and increasingly unable to provide for his or her own care. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide emotional support, information and resources to help participants ensure their own well-being while remaining involved in the intense care of a loved one. Also included are care receiver support groups that help people who have a caregiver cope with the fact that they require care. Care receiver support groups are often offered in conjunction with caregiver support groups and are structured to allow care receivers to participate in their own group while their caregiver attends another.
  • Developmental Assessment (1)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child's cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Disease/Disability Information (1)
    LH-2700.1700

    Disease/Disability Information

    LH-2700.1700

    Programs that provide information about the causes and origins, preventive measures, symptoms, screening/diagnostic procedures, and/or methods of treatment or management including the latest research for specific illnesses or disabling conditions.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (1)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Educational Support Services (1)
    HL

    Educational Support Services

    HL

    Programs within the formal education system at elementary, secondary or postsecondary levels, or offered by outside agencies, that provide non-instructional services which support the admission of students to an educational program, their health and living conditions while students, their extracurricular activities options, and their ability to choose an appropriate course of study and adjust to and remain in school through the completion of their high school diplomas or college/university degrees.
  • Geriatric Counseling (2)
    RP-1400.8000-270

    Geriatric Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-270

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance in a variety of settings for older adults who are having mental, emotional or social adjustment problems that have arisen as a result of the process of aging. Geriatric counseling services are provided primarily by social services professionals including licensed social workers rather that psychiatrists or other medical personnel.
  • Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities (1)
    BH-8400.6000-280

    Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-280

    Agency-owned or operated facilities that provide an alternative living environment for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities, multiple disabilities or chronic illnesses such as AIDS who are in need of personal services, supervision and/or assistance essential for self-protection or sustaining the activities of daily living and consequently are unable to live with their own families or in a more independent setting. Group residences for adults with disabilities may be licensed by the state and may be distinguished according to the level of service residents require. Service levels depend on the self-care skills residents possess, their limitations in the areas of physical coordination and mobility, and the presence and extent of behavior problems including disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
  • Home Health Care (5)
    LT-2800

    Home Health Care

    LT-2800

    Programs that make necessary medical services available in the homes of people who are aged, ill or convalescing.
  • Home Improvement/Accessibility (1)
    BH-3000

    Home Improvement/Accessibility

    BH-3000

    Programs that pay for or provide assistance in the form of consultation, labor and/or supplies for people want to build an accessible home or need to upgrade their homes to make them attractive, safe, accessible and energy-efficient.
  • In Home Assistance (5)
    PH-3300

    In Home Assistance

    PH-3300

    Programs that provide assistance in performing routine household, yard and personal care activities for older adults, people with disabilities, eligible low income people, families whose normal routines have been disrupted by an emergency or others who need or want these services. The objective of in-home assistance is to help the recipient sustain independent living in a clean, safe and healthy home environment.
  • Interpretation/Translation (1)
    PH-3500

    Interpretation/Translation

    PH-3500

    Programs that enable individuals who have visual or hearing impairments, who speak, read or write a language other than English and/or who require documents that have been translated into plain language to access information or communicate their needs manually, verbally and/or in writing; or to have improved access to entertainment, educational or artistic events or facilities that feature important visual or audio content.
  • Local Transportation (1)
    BT-4500

    Local Transportation

    BT-4500

    Organizations that arrange for or provide transportation for individuals whose points of origin and destinations are within their community or other nearby communities. These organizations also provide information for the public about rates, schedules and routes for these services.
  • Long Term Care Ombudsman Programs (1)
    FT-4950

    Long Term Care Ombudsman Programs

    FT-4950

    Programs that investigate and attempt to resolve complaints made by or on behalf of residents of nursing facilities, residential care homes, assisted living facilities and other supervised living facilities for older adults. The program also promotes policies and practices that improve the quality of life, health, safety, welfare and rights of residents; monitors laws, regulations and policies that affect those who live in long-term care facilities; provides the public with information about long-term care options; and promotes the development of consumer organizations concerned about long-term care. Under the federal Older Americans Act, every state is required to have an Ombudsman Program that addresses complaints and advocates for improvements in the long term care system.
  • Mentoring Programs (6)
    PH-1400.5000

    Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000

    Programs that provide companionship, guidance and/or role models for individuals who are disadvantaged because of age, income, physical or developmental disabilities or family environment.
  • Paratransit Programs (1)
    BT-4500.6500

    Paratransit Programs

    BT-4500.6500

    Programs that provide flexibly scheduled and routed transportation services using low capacity vehicles such as vans for community residents who do not have private transportation and are unable to use the fixed-route public transportation system. Paratransit services generally operate within normal urban transit corridors or rural areas; and may be used by the general public or limited to special populations such as people who are elderly or have a disability, individuals who are not in a sober enough condition to drive their own vehicles or people who are endangered.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (6)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Respite Care (9)
    PH-7000

    Respite Care

    PH-7000

    Programs that provide a brief period of relief or rest for family members, guardians or other people who are regular caregivers for dependent adults or children by offering temporary or intermittent care in the home or in community settings/facilities.
  • Senior Centers (4)
    TC-5500.8000

    Senior Centers

    TC-5500.8000

    Multipurpose centers that serve as focal points for older adults in the community and which offer, at a single location, a wide variety of services and activities that are needed by and of interest to this population.
  • Service Animals (1)
    LR-7950

    Service Animals

    LR-7950

    Programs that provide and train recipients in the use of animals who have been taught to help individuals who have disabilities increase their mobility and independence and/or maximize their ability to communicate effectively.
  • Supported Employment (6)
    ND-6500.8120

    Supported Employment

    ND-6500.8120

    Programs that find paid, meaningful work in a variety of community-based settings for people who have disabilities and which assign a "job coach" to work side-by-side with each client to interface with the employer and other employees, and provide training in basic job skills and work-related behaviors, assistance with specific tasks as needed and whatever other initial or ongoing support is required to ensure that the individual retains competitive employment. Included are individual placement models in which a job coach works on-the-job with a single individual and group models such as enclaves (which are self-contained work units of people needing support) and mobile work crews, in which a group of workers with disabilities receives continuous support and supervision from supported employment personnel. In the enclave model, groups of people with disabilities are trained to work as a team alongside employees in the host business supported by a specially trained on-site supervisor, who may work either for the host company or the placement agency. A variation of the enclave approach is called the "dispersed enclave" and is used in service industries (e.g., restaurants and hotels). Each person works on a separate job, and the group is dispersed throughout the company. In the mobile work crew model, a small team of people with disabilities works as a self-contained business and undertakes contract work such as landscaping and gardening projects. The crew works at various locations in a variety of settings within the community under the supervision of a job coach.
  • Telecommunication Relay Services (1)
    PH-3500.8500

    Telecommunication Relay Services

    PH-3500.8500

    Programs that allow people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairments to communicate through a communications assistant with people who use a standard telephone or the Internet. The communications assistant relays TTY (text telephone or telecommunications device for deaf and hard of hearing individuals) to the telephone user and types that person's response back to the TTY user. Three options when using a telephone relay service are voice carry-over (VCO), hearing carry-over (HCO) and speech-to-speech (STS). VCO allows a person with a hearing impairment to speak directly to the other party and then read the response typed by a communications assistant. HCO allows a person with a speech impairment to hear the other party and relay the TTY response back to the telephone user through the communications assistant. STS provides assistance for people with speech disabilities who have difficulty being understood on the phone. STS communications assistants are specially trained in understanding a variety of speech disorders, which enables them to repeat what the caller says in a manner that makes the caller’s words clear and understandable to the called party. The relay service allows individuals with communication disorders to communicate with all telephone users. Telecommunication relay services can be reached by dialing 711.
  • Vocational Rehabilitation (6)
    ND-9000

    Vocational Rehabilitation

    ND-9000

    Programs that enable individuals with disabilities, people who abuse drugs or alcohol, or people who have emotional problems to obtain the training and employment experiences they need to achieve economic self-sufficiency. Services may include vocational evaluation, work adjustment, work experience, training in marketable skills and placement in competitive employment or a sheltered work environment.