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Disability-Related Services

    Results: 13

  • ADA Implementation Assistance (1)
    TP-4000.3250-050

    ADA Implementation Assistance

    TP-4000.3250-050

    Programs that provide assistance for organizations that are in the process of implementing the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and have questions regarding its requirements.
  • Adult Day Programs (6)
    PH-0320

    Adult Day Programs

    PH-0320

    Programs that provide care and supervision in a protective setting for dependent adults living in the community during some portion of a 24-hour day. Services may include social and recreational activities, training that is essential for sustaining activities of daily living, hot meals, as appropriate and, if an adult day health care center, health and related services.
  • Developmental Assessment (2)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child’s cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Developmental Disabilities Behavior Management Programs (2)
    LR-3100.1800-160

    Developmental Disabilities Behavior Management Programs

    LR-3100.1800-160

    Community-based day programs for adults with developmental disabilities and/or dual diagnosis who are unable to access other day settings because of their behavior problems. The objective of these programs is to help participants modify their behavior and develop the functional skills that are required for success in an adult development center or an activity center.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (1)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities (1)
    BH-8400.6000-280

    Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-280

    Agency-owned or operated facilities that provide an alternative living environment for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities, multiple disabilities or chronic illnesses such as AIDS who are in need of personal services, supervision and/or assistance essential for self-protection or sustaining the activities of daily living and consequently are unable to live with their own families or in a more independent setting. Group residences for adults with disabilities may be licensed by the state and may be distinguished according to the level of service residents require. Service levels depend on the self-care skills residents possess, their limitations in the areas of physical coordination and mobility, and the presence and extent of behavior problems including disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
  • Health/Disability Related Support Groups (5)
    PN-8100.3000

    Health/Disability Related Support Groups

    PN-8100.3000

    Mutual support groups whose members are people who have specific disabilities, illnesses or other health conditions, their families and friends. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share information, resources, practical tips for daily living and encouragement about issues related to the disability or health problem.
  • Independent Living Skills Instruction (3)
    LR-3200

    Independent Living Skills Instruction

    LR-3200

    Programs that assist people who have disabilities to learn the basic skills of daily living through individual and group counseling and instruction, experience and practice in coping with real or simulated life situational demands; or through the use of assistive devices, special equipment and specialized assistants. Services include but are not limited to training in the ability to travel about the community alone; to live independently in a private residence; to maintain health through self-care and use of medical services; to live within personal income; to maintain acceptable grooming and appearance; to deal with legal, family or social problems; and to cope with other requirements for successful independent living.
  • Occupational Therapy (1)
    LR-6200

    Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200

    Programs that evaluate the task performance skills of individuals who may be having difficulty engaging in self-care, work, play or leisure time activities and help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations). Occupational therapy services typically include an individualized evaluation, during which the individual/family and occupational therapist agree on the person's goals; customized intervention to improve the person's ability to perform daily activities and reach their goals; and an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met. Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.
  • Paratransit Programs (1)
    BT-4500.6500

    Paratransit Programs

    BT-4500.6500

    Programs that provide flexibly scheduled and routed transportation services using low capacity vehicles such as vans for community residents who do not have private transportation and are unable to use the fixed-route public transportation system. Paratransit services generally operate within normal urban transit corridors or rural areas; and may be used by the general public or limited to special populations such as people who are elderly or have a disability, individuals who are not in a sober enough condition to drive their own vehicles or people who are endangered.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (4)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Special Education Advocacy (1)
    FT-8000.8000

    Special Education Advocacy

    FT-8000.8000

    Programs that work to ensure that children and youth with disabilities receive a free, appropriate, public education often by providing assistance for parents who need support in seeking and obtaining needed early intervention, educational, medical or therapeutic services for their children.
  • Supported Employment (3)
    ND-6500.8120

    Supported Employment

    ND-6500.8120

    Programs that find paid, meaningful work in a variety of community-based settings for people who have disabilities and which assign a "job coach" to work side-by-side with each client to interface with the employer and other employees, and provide training in basic job skills and work-related behaviors, assistance with specific tasks as needed and whatever other initial or ongoing support is required to ensure that the individual retains competitive employment. Included are individual placement models in which a job coach works on-the-job with a single individual and group models such as enclaves (which are self-contained work units of people needing support) and mobile work crews, in which a group of workers with disabilities receives continuous support and supervision from supported employment personnel. In the enclave model, groups of people with disabilities are trained to work as a team alongside employees in the host business supported by a specially trained on-site supervisor, who may work either for the host company or the placement agency. A variation of the enclave approach is called the "dispersed enclave" and is used in service industries (e.g., restaurants and hotels). Each person works on a separate job, and the group is dispersed throughout the company. In the mobile work crew model, a small team of people with disabilities works as a self-contained business and undertakes contract work such as landscaping and gardening projects. The crew works at various locations in a variety of settings within the community under the supervision of a job coach.
 
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